IAAP Congress 2001 : Cambridge

  • Congress Proceedings : Cambridge 2001

    IAAP Congress Proceedings 2001

    IAAP : Cambridge 2001: Congress Proceedings

    Cambridge 2001: Proceedings of the 15th International Congress for Analytical Psychology
    The Fifteenth Triannual Congress of the International Association for Analytical Psychology (IAAP) took place on the grounds of St. John’s College in Cambridge, England from August 19-24, 2001. It was a memorable occasion both in its preparation and its incarnation and the present volume is meant to preserve at least a portion of what transpired: the papers comprising the program. The presentations and events were more far-reaching and all-inclusive than ever before, incorporating numerous political and intercultural issues and including representatives from psychoanalysis and other fields of endeavor for the first time.

     

     

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  • Farewell Address : Luigi Zoja 2001

    Farewell Address: Luigi Zoja, IAAP President

    Congress : August 2001 : Cambridge

    Continuity is important , and I will start this address with a reference to the last two Presidents.

    In his 1995 Farwell Address, President Tom Kirsch noted that the IAAP Constitution was basically the one of its origin – that is the 1950ies – and hoped for changes in it.

    In her 1998 Farwell Address, President Kast underlined that many constitutional reforms had been set in place, aiming at more participation and shared democratic processes.

    As it has been explained in detail in the last Newsletter - and as I have tried to summarize in my Report - also during this term the Executive Committee has been working hard in that direction. However, we have also realized new activities within the existing Constitution. Also in this sense continuity is important. For instance, calling the Council of Societies with much advance, has given it the possibility of having a really effective role. And splitting the Executive Committee into many Sub-Committees with specific tasks, has allowed better coordination and the accomplishment of much more work – of course, at the cost of supplementary work on the part of the Committees. Both things were not foreseen by IAAP Constitution.

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