Health & Mental Health Treatment & Prevention

Health & Mental Health Treatment & Prevention

Medical Education

WAHBA, LILIANA L. (2001)
Doctoral thesis in Clinical Psychology: THE DOCTOR-PATIENT RELATIONSHIP: A PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTION TO MEDICAL EDUCATION.
Advisor: Professor Denise Ramos
Keywords: doctor-patient relationship, medical education, analytical psychology.
Abstract: Medicine has centered on the biomedical model, with sure results and scientific achievements of vital importance. The model is used in medical schools, giving priority to objective language and the functions of thought and sensation. Still, advances in fields related to neuroscience, neuroimmunology and psychosomatic research confirm increasingly the important effects of the psyche on health and illness. The scientific theories and authors covered in this study show that attention given to subjective language and non-verbal behavior, besides being beneficial in the patient's welcome and adhesion, is considered a clinical instrument. The usage of this instrument helps detect and respond to processes little perceived by logical conscience, engendering sickness or well-being. This study aims to evaluate a method of psychological work in groups, that enhances non-verbal communication and valuation functions of conscience, that is, the feeling function, encouraging medical students' and residents' learning of attitudes that enable them to better deal with themselves and with the patient relationship. Researched attitudes concern interpersonal communication, professional role and relationship with the patient that are liable to influencing the clinical conduct of the doctor in diagnosis and treatment. In this presentation, following a bibliographic review of concepts that were essential in drawing up the work, the procedure indicates the manner in which group meetings with 3rd year medical students and residents were conducted. Also presented are the questionnaires that were given, with their respective evaluations. Upon discussion of the data, it was concluded that, despite the existence of strong psychological defense mechanisms, partially developed in the course of medical studies, there were signs of changes in attitudes in the mentioned areas, underscoring the importance of giving continuity to such psychological methods in medical education.
Institution: Pontif